22 3 / 2013

People in Bangalore are really busy and they need time to unwind from their busy schedules. So weekends have garnered special place in everybody’s life. To cater to the relaxing weekends, many new entities have opened up, and of these, playing laser tag seems to be a favorite pastime. There is already a group started on finderous for the company which hosts laser tag. Check out this group : IAMGame Laser Tag.

IAMGame provides an inexpensive way of having fun and it caters to a large group of people as well. So even if it is an office party or a casual group of friends looking to have a time of their own, IAMGame is the best place to go to and play laser tag.

IAMGame has two offices and Bangalore and they seem to be doing really well. I would definitely recommend it to my friends.

 

Vikrant

19 3 / 2013

Startups seems to be a hot topic on Finderous. There are a few groups that are dedicated to startups and a few that will lead you to a building your own startup. Take a look at these listed groups if startups are something interest you:

We started finderous with the aim of bringing people together to discuss their interests at the places they find themselves most of the time. Most of the above groups have been started at the lovely city of San Francisco and the surrounding Bay Area, however, it won’ t be long when every one of us will realize the power of communities and join them on finderous to express their interests.

Meanwhile, if you are an entrepreneur, I strongly urge you to join these groups and contribute positively to the great communities.

 

Cheers

Vikrant 

15 2 / 2013

Today TheIPhoneAppReview published Finderous app review on their website and it looks cool with an overall 4 star rating of the app. You can read the review here.

 

Cheers

Vikrant

15 2 / 2013

I am a coder. I love to code. I think coding is like writing poetry. There is so much rhyme and rhythm one can put into a small piece of code that it just takes your breath away. I love to create such poetic masterpieces. Or, at least I would like to think of them as masterpieces.

Masterpiece or not, there is always a greater, more resolved poet who can make my poetry even more beautiful.

Anyways, code is like poetry and as with some poems, there are life lessons to be learned. There is a great deal of philosophy involved that directly draws parallels to the life situations. Life situation that involve committing mistakes; committing errors. I have not seen even one person who has not committed a mistake in his or her life. We all know that we commit mistakes, and, as rightly been advised, we should learn from them.

Coding is also like that. We make mistakes in the code, the code goes into a test run and it crashes. We immediately correct the mistakes and lo, the code is running fine.

Now, there are two types of mistakes: silly mistakes and the grave ones. There are coders who commit silly mistakes and there are those who commit grave ones. The people who commit grave mistakes are likely to be more dangerous to the product’s reputation. Dangerous, because, they are so adept and confident at doing small things perfectly that they themselves don’t know when they have committed a grave mistake and even the test run cannot find it out. These grave mistakes raise their heads in the form of critical outages when the product is running into a production mode. It halts everything. The product’s reputation and hence, the company’s reputation is largely at stake due to the grave mistake coders.

Is that a problem? If it is, what’s the solution? Let’s try to solve the problem by removing the grave mistake coders from our company and just have the not so confident silly mistake coders. These silly mistake coders will eventually learn a lot from their mistakes, raise their confidence levels, and finally they will become the grave mistake coders. However, their evolution will take multiple test runs of the product which means more time.

At a startup, you don’t have the luxury of time and it’s better to have a grave mistake coder on your team than the one who makes silly mistakes and takes a lot of time to learn. It’s better to have the product spend time in the production than in the test runs. Eventually, it’s the grave mistake coder who will bring in the sales.

Here is the post by Brendan Baker on Quora which summarizes what we should do with time in a startup: http://www.quora.com/Brendan-Baker/Posts/JFSI.

Vikrant

01 2 / 2013

Recently I ran a promoted post on Facebook for the release of the latest version of iPhone app for Finderous. The statistics that came out of the promotion are quite interesting and I wanted to share these stats with you and make some sense out of them (yeah some sense). If you have an experience with such statistics, please share the link with us.

Before I started the analysis, I thought the stats would loosely conform to the social media rule of 90-9-1 that says out of 100 people, 90 will consume content, 9 will interact and 1 will share with their social circle. But the figures are little different and I wonder if one should rely on the social media rule.

Anyways, here is the picture of the promotion statistics:

image

So out of 6.5K users who saw this post around 65 users ‘liked’ it. Which means the action of the 1% of the users has resulted in sharing of the content among those user’s social graph. But, just this action wouldn’t mean that all the friends of these users will see the ‘like’ in their newsfeed. Here is one more statistics for these figures.

image

So from this figure, the Viral reach is 2977 or roughly 3K. Which essentially means that 65 likes has resulted in 3K viral views of the post. This is really a good number.

But wait, it’s just a number. My main aim is not to have a number of users liking a post. Rather have them download my app.

On the days of promotion, the number of downloads as reported on the iTunes was a mere 11. Disheartening.

Anyways, the final statistics are:

1. Number of post impressions: 6.5K

2. Number of post likes: 65

3. Number of Viral views: 3K

4. Number of downloads: 11.

At this point, let’s make an assumption (which may not be totally incorrect) the users who liked the post are likely to have downloaded the app. This means out of 65 users who liked the Facebook post, 11 or roughly 17% have downloaded it.

I assume the download % would be somewhere between 10-20% of users liking the post, or 0.1-0.2 % of number of users seeing this post. The number depends upon likability of the post, time of the day, and whether the person at 21.3114 N, 157.7964 W sneezed on time or not.

In the end, I ask myself, should anyone even care about these statistics?

I don’t know the answer, but I am off to promotions at various events. Will post any relevant experiences from there.

Cheers

Vikrant

22 1 / 2013

Go on, touch it, it’s too furry and soft. It’s so fluffy that you are gonna die. 

  No, seriously, the new Finderous is so great that you will have fun making groups with people you know and people you don’t know.

Make groups for:

  1. Weekend Jam sessions
  2. Carpool around San Francisco
  3. San Francisco Casual Bakers.
  4. Daily casual running groups.

Just run your imagination wild and create/join groups at finderous with it latest iPhone app at the App Store.

Cheers,

Vikrant

16 1 / 2013

I have spent a few weeks rewriting the Finderous app and the website and it has come nicely with the app being submitted to the app store for the review.

The new version of Finderous is also a kind of a reboot. Finderous now focuses on location based interest groups. Now people around a location will find or create groups of their interests and interact with people around them with similar interests. It is definitely a great way to communicate with people around you. Here are a few screen shots of the app that is submitted.

Screen 2

Screen 1

Screen 3

Screen 4

Screen 5

09 8 / 2012

Finderous Rage-Guy goes on a date

30 7 / 2012

Finderous iPhone App Review - DailyAppShow - The Daily App Show - iPhone, iPad, Android & Mac App Reviews on Blip

(Source: blip.tv)

21 7 / 2012

"Discover life. Ask other people."